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70 miles per hour in connecticut, taking down power lines and trees. diane, i wanted to go back to that image inside the detroit whiteout today. now, if this happens, the recommendation is to gradually slow down, turn on your flashers and if you can get off the highway, do so. diane? >> again, you have to act fast. thank you so much, ginger zee reporting in tonight. >>> and now, in washington today, one man entered the arena. chuck hagel, the purple heart recipient from the vietnam war, the former senator, nominated to be secretary of defense. his former colleagues met him with a fuselage of critical questions today, and abc's chief washington correspondent jonathan karl tells us about the fiery day. >> reporter: he's a vietnam veteran and former republican senator, but today chick hagel found himself and his judgment under attack by a fellow republican and vietnam vet. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be -- >> the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since -- >> since vietnam. were you correct or incorrect? >> well, i'm not go
hackers from that secret army building in shanghai, diane. >> all right, brian ross, thank you. >>> and now, to the deepening mystery in the murder case against olympic hero oscar today, we saw dueling images. the once beloved athlete in court, hearing the charges against him. solemn, sober. while 700 miles away, there was a memorial for his girlfriend. tonight, two contradictory versions of what happened, and abc's bazi kanani takes us through both. >> reporter: in reeva steenkamp's hometown, her family gathered to say good-bye. >> there's only one thing missing, it's reeva. >> reporter: today, pistorius explained for the first time his version of events on that valentine's day. they were both sleeping, pistorius said, when he woke up and went onto the balcony when he heard a noise in the bathroom. in the pitch dark, he grabbed his gun and rushed into the bathroom, noticed an open window and thought an intruder was hiding in the toilet room. "i knew i had to protect reeva and myself," he wrote. he says he yelled for her to call police. and while still without prosthetics, he f
right now. cecilia? >> reporter: diane, good evening. the situation is still ongoing. this is what we know. christopher dorner is holed up on a house on that mountain. two officers have been shot and wounded. los angeles police just went on live television to broadcast a plea to him. telling him, enough is enough, it's time to turn yourself in. >> if he's watching this, a message for himself is, enough is enough. it's time to turn yourself in, it's time to stop the bloodshed. it's time to let this event and let this incident be over. >> reporter: in the remote mountains above los angeles today, a violent shootout. gun fire as officers in s.w.a.t. gear closed in on the man accused of killing one of their own and tormenting an entire community for the past six days. the whole exchange broadcast on live television. authorities say the suspect, holed up inside the hillside cabin, is christopher dorner, a former los angeles police officer skilled in sniper tactics. >> during that exchange of gun fire, two officers were injured. they've been air lifted to a local hospital. right now, their
between robin and diane sawyer about what she finds most liberating so far. >>> but let's get right to some breaking news, olympic sprinter oscar pistorius just granted bail in south africa, an audible question from supporters in court. the judge spoke for over two hours before ruling. abc's bazi kanani is tracking the latest. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, amy. oscar pistorius just broke down in tears when the judge announced just moments ago that he has been granted bail, that he will be allowed to go home. his family shouted for joy. they were huddled together. the magistrate said that this is not a matter of whether he's guilty but whether he has the right to have bail until he stands trial. the magistrate said that there were a couple of main factors that he considered in his decision. and those are whether pistorius is a flight risk and whether pistorius is a danger to anyone else in the community if he's allowed to go free. the midge straight said that the profession cushion wasn't able to prove that. at this moment, oscar pistorius is in the courtroom, he's listeni
problem, and diane, it may not be the biggest problem. take a look at this storm system, when it finally gets together. what you're seeing on the ray door tonight is not even the real storm. the storm really kicks in tomorrow, getting all its energy. it has a layer of measurable ice and that's basically, already ice storm warnings out for northern arkansas and southern missouri. that's miserable ice, we think. and this line of severe storms from new orleans, including texas, all the way to mississippi. those storms could have tornadoes in them. we could be reporting on all of it during the day tomorrow. just something everyone should look for. >> not a little bit of everything, it's a lot of everything heading their way. >> reporter: a lot. >> thank you so much, sam. good to see you tonight. >>> and now, we head off to south africa and the big twist today in the case against olympian oscar pistorius. at his bail hearing, the prosecution was under pressure, backing away from a claim about steroids near his bed. abc's bazi kanani, back on the story for us. >> reporter: stoic, oscar pistori
the first class under the wisconsin workforce partnership program. diane stepp joined the program because she was unemployed, after being laid off, and was looking for a new career. diane has already been hired by amerequip corporation in new holstein as a cnc operator, and she started work yesterday. diane is here with us tonight. we also worked with the university of wisconsin system on a new flexible degree program called uw flexoption to help targeted fields. nearly a quarter of all adults in this state have some college credit without a degree. for many, time and money are the barriers to finishing that degree. i can relate. during my senior year at marquette university, i was offered a full-time job at the american red cross. i thought i would squeeze in a course here or there and finish things off in a year or two, but then tonette and i got married. then we had matt. and then came alex. next thing you know, you're putting all your extra time and money into your kids. the uw flexoption will provide a less time-consuming, less costly way to finish off a degree. it will help prepare
robin and diane sawyer, about what robin finds most liberating right now. >> we're looking forward to that. >>> but we are also standing by for breaking news in the bail hearing of olympic sprinter oscar pistorius. we'll have that any moment. we're listening to what's happening inside the courtroom. we'll bring that to you as soon as we have it. >>> but let's get started with the blast of snow and cold that is making a mess of the morning commute for much of the country right now. sam is tracking it all for us right now. >> good morning, amy. good morning, everyone. it's not just the snow and ice and cold you're talking about. when you add in the storm, it's more than 1,100 miles worth of storm, from the great lakes to the gulf coast. we'll start this morning with one of the tornadoes in mississippi and louisiana. we had them popping there. you can see it in the light area, across the field, the twitter pictures. the idea that four tornadoes possibly in that zone. we know that three have been reported. now, we're looking at storm damage that is eerily similar to a tornado in that e
protestors for the group made before diane fine stein had enough and cleared the hearing room during some calmer moments we heard john brennan explain his fiphilosophy which included defense of the obama administration's drone program. >> i never believed in a terrorist event to detain him. we want to detain as much as possible to get information from them to prevent further terrorist attacks. >> the agency started using enhanced interrogation techniques like waterboarding. yesterday he changed his tune a little bit. >> i have expressed my personal objections and views about certain of those eit's such as waterboarding nudity and others where i professed my personal objections to it but i did not try to stop it because it was something that was being done in a different part of the agency under the authority of others. >> some senators yesterday noted concern about the lack of transparency surrounding the drone program. other democrats like the chair diane fine stein supported him more thoroughly. fine stein says he will make a fine leader for the cia. >> it is time for your 5@5:00. >> so
days in prayer and study. in his words, diane, he will be hidden to the world. >> all right, george, our thanks to you. and, of course, when the pope leaves, it will be up to the cardinals and their vote. and here's one snapshot from a modern pilgrimage. there he was, boston's cardinal o'malley, on the plane to rome, with a newspaper, wearing his signature simple brown robe. and we were all rewinding this tape today. seven years ago, take a look. there, sealed with a ribbon, a key turns and a new pope, pope benedict, is shown around his new home. the papal apartment. there are ten rooms, floors of 16th century marble. a library crowned with an antique ceiling. and soon, another man will be passing through that door, a pope chosen in the mysterious ritual known as the conclave. abc's david wright tells us about the ancient vote to come. >> reporter: before the cardinals file into the sistine chapel and lock the doors behind them, technicians will have pulled up the floorboards to install cell phone jamming devices. violating the secrecy is punishable by excommunication. >> it's a way
of a seven year old political grudge. >> joining me now is diane black. representative, great to see you. >> it's great to be with you. thank you for having me today. >> you bet. >> the president is about to honor six women who died at sandy hook and talking about gun legislation, the president said in the state of the union they deserve a vote. what do you think to the representatives who have made the same call? >> i want to say i cannot imagine being in the situation of the terrible losses that happened there at sandy hook and my heart goes out to all of the family members and that entire community. first of all, the president has not put a plan on the table and neither has the senate. but there are all kinds of solutions that the president is talking about. we have to talk about mental health. we have to talk about the people who use guns in crimes are really penalized to the highest standard that we can penalize them. the unprecedented amount of violence that the young people are seeing, these are issues that we need to talk about to make sure that when we do what we do we're truly
over ten years in additional spending cuts. diane swonk is chief economist at mesereau financial. alice rev lin was a member of the president's debt commission and is a senior fellow at the brookings institution. michael tanner is a senior fellow at the cato institute. thanks for being here. michael, you say we should not fear door number one. that is the forced budget cuts, what some people know as the skweser, as it stands, which goes into place on friday if we don't do anything. why? >> well, let's remember that first of all these are cults only in the washington sense that any reduction from future planned increases in spending is a cut. the reality is even if the sequester goes into effect, the federal government will spend more every year. by 2022 it will spend $2 trillion more than it is spending today. we're talking about cuts that are 2.4% of total federal spending. if the federal government can't cut three cents out of every dollar without throwing us into the dark ages, then clearly we're doing something wrong. >> all right, alice rivlin. simpson/bowles, i mentioned that, the
three people prior to this, another deputy died today. >> world news with diane saw jer up next. see you for the staift of the from washington, d.c. and tonight, we begin with breaking news. a shootout in the mountains of california, as police appear to close in on the former cop accused of a murderous rampage. >>> making his case. what the president will say tonight about jobs and gun violence in america. >> we'll find out tonight. >>> what's next? we show you where pope benedict will live after he resigns. and will one of these men make history as the new pope? >>> good evening from washington, d.c. we are here to cover the president's state of the union address tonight. but we begin with the breaking news at this hour, out of california. police closing in on the former cop accused of the murder rampage. christopher dorner exchanging fire with s.w.a.t. teams. officers wounded, images streaming in of police officers, guns drawn, searching cars. and abc's cecilia vega is there to tell us what is happening right now. cecilia? >> reporter: diane, good evening. the situation is still ongoin
outside right now. speaking of that beautiful day diane has been talking about, let's show you that golden orange sunset about to take shape from looking around emeryville off towards san francisco. mostly clear, beautiful skies. that is about to change, though. we're going to see a lot more clouds this time tomorrow. some of that will be due to the sea breeze which will push in low clouds tonight, also a storm system up the coast will drop our way and we'll see a big time drop in temperatures. the system we're watching is approaching the pacific northwest. this is part of the big pattern change that's going to bring in that drop of cold air. this time tomorrow night in to tuesday will be the main event of this weather change. that's going to bring us some rain. that's not so unusual this time of year or seeing some breezy conditions, 15 to 30 miles per hour. but here's some of the other headliners, as we see that cold air spill in, snow will be possible 2,000 to 3,000 feet. only near 50. you have chilly air moving into the bay area. that will be a possibility. higher peaks like mount diab
're a total elipse of the heart. heart. heart. this is my friend didiane. she's played by the rules her whole life. but then the rules flew right out the window. having just lost her husband, she stepped up and adopted her three grandkids, while working full time and caring for her brother, eddie, with cerebral palsy. i get the three children up. i walk andrew at eight i drop olivia off at eight thirty. spend a few minutes at emilio's school. i stop at the grocery store, and then i might do some laundry that has to be done. and then i have about five minutes. the baby sitter comes in and then i go to work. i'm not back home again until 11:30 at night. hard as she works, it's still a struggle to keep up with the bills and stay warm at night. when we asked the biggest oil companies to help families in need, only citgo, the people of venezuela, and president hugo chavez responded. thanks to them, citizens energy is able to deliver millions of gallons of fuel to families just like diane's. i'm joe kennedy. if you need help staying warm this winter, call me at 1-877-joe-4-oil. because no one shoul
there was a shark right off the dock. >> oh, yeah, mary lee! big girl! >>> good evening on this tuesday night. diane is on assignment. and we do begin here with those terrifying images from the sky. this evening, investigators are trying to figure out what caused a hot air balloon with nearly two dozen people inside in one of the biggest tourist destinations in the world, to explode and plummet to the ground. here are the images of it, as it was falling from the sky, the last few seconds before it crashed. tonight, the death toll at 19, and abc's alex marquardt leads us off from egypt. >> reporter: this amateur video shows the moment the vacation of a lifetime turned into tragedy. a sunrise balloon ride suddenly enveloped in black smoke. you can see it billowing from the basket. then the balloon begins to collapse. deflated, it now plummets a thousand feet down to earth. photographer christopher michel watched it all unfold from another balloon. >> we heard a loud explosion and then a lot of smoke right behind us. our first feeling was it couldn't be a balloon but it turned out actually to be, unfor
.2 trillion over ten years, in additional spending cuts. diane swonk is the chief economist at. michael tanner is a senior fellow at the cato institute. welcome to all of you. michael, let me start with you, you say we should not fear doorm number one. the budget cuts, the sequester, why? >> well let's remember first of all, these are cuts only in the washington sense that any reduction from future planned increases in spending is a cut. the reality is, even if the sequester goes into effect, the federal government will spend more every year by 2022, it will spend $2 trillion more than it is spending today. we're talking about cuts that are 2.4% of total federal spending. if the federal government can't cut three cents out of every dollar without throwing us into the dark ages, then clearly we're doing something wrong. >> all right. alice riflen, simpson-bowles, i mentioned they're at it again. listen to this. >> to get this done we're going to have to, this was clear at the end of last year, we're going to have to push both sides out of their comfort zone. the republicans are going to have to
, the state of the union and the republican response. now, reporting from our nation's capital, diane sawyer and george stephanopoulos. >> and a good evening to all of you. we welcome you, as we gather with you to watch president obama's state of the union address. as he challenges congress and tries to harness public opinion behind his plan of action for the first year of his second term. >> the focus will be on the economy, diane. creating jobs. that's been the struggle of his presidency. the president believes he has the public on his side on that issue. most of the speech will be about that. but he has a new mission for his second term. ending gun violence and so much emotion around that issue tonight. >> emotion in that room and also this convergence with the drama we have seen unfolding today out in california. just to bring you up to date right now, the gun battle that was under way in big bear lake, california, you can still see the flames at that cabin where police officers believe they had trapped christopher dorner, the ex-cop who had been on a murderous rampage for the last nine
homeowners into foreclosure. will history repeat itself? diane macedo has the story for us. many home buyers are buying houses with 100 percent financing. banks say they are not repeating the same that helped push the u.s. into a housing crisis a few years ago. this time around they are almost exclusive by being offered with clients with sizable assets and still require of form of collateral. instead of a down payment it's a piece of the investment portfolio. 20-40 percent is secured by investments. you might think people who have that kind of investment portfolio probably have carbon hand, too. this allows them avoid tieing up funds or making withdraws from interest earning accounts especially in some cases the return on investments is bigger than the rate they pay on their loan. it allows them to avoid the capital gains tax that would come with liquidating their investment portfolios. it makes up a small portion of the banks's lending. it sites a 10 percent increase in 2012 from the year before. they sadie manned is 2-3 times more than what it was. >> can't believe we are back here already
a week, she woke up to a beautiful sight this morning -- her sweet little boy. diane? >> and we love looking at his face and his smile. but gio, let me go back for a moment. the man with the gun, do i understand correctly? he had a television, he could see all of you reporting and what was behind you, he had no idea, right out of frame, were commandos preparing for this raid? >> reporter: in fact, they were training right next to the media here. >> all right, well, thank you so much, gio. again, it was an amazing, bold strike on their part. thank you. >>> and with our thanks to gio, we turn now to that secret document, 16 pages long and stirring up so much controversy tonight. it is a kind of handbook for lethal power against terrorists, even if they are american citizens. abc's chief white house correspondent jonathan karl tells us about the news today. >> reporter: by one count, president obama has already used unmanned cia drones to strike more than 300 suspected terrorist targets, even more than his predecessor. but today, we learned just how much authority the administration bel
are living paycheck to paycheck. diane macedo has more. gad morning, diane. >> good morning patti ann. a new study says more than 4 in 10 americans are living paycheck to paycheck. one in ten can't even do that. the survey conducted by allstate insurance company not only shows the challenges americans are facing in a weak economy but many make unwise financial decisions even when they know better. according to the survey 59 percent of americans say they generally know how to manage their money. 47 percent say they are saving less than they should be. as for how they feel about their financial situation, half of the 1,000 respond ants describe theirs as excellent or good while half said it was fair or poor. 41 percent live from one paycheck to the next while 8 percent say they don't earn enough to afford every day essentia essentials. 80 -- 80 percent say they are better than friends and others say they are better off than their family. >> a school district bans kids from wearing jeans and t-shirts. wait until you hear why. do you toss and turn and stay up all night because of the changing te
. here with the numbers is diane macedo from the fox business network. good morning diane. >> gas prices are continuing their record setting climb here. it is under 3.78 cents the heist it has err been for this time of year. $0.43 jump from where it was a month ago. this year's run up isn't only larger and faster than recent years but it is beginning earlier than usual due in part to u.s. refineries performing seasonal nans and making the switch over to summer blend gasoline earlier in the year. another reason for the price shock is a fear factor unrest in the middle east particularly in syria and iran. the site has drivers and analysts alike wondering how high prices will go and when they will begin to retreat. the good news there is triple a is projecting the price this swing will be lower than it was the last two years. the bad news is already new numbers for the federal administration are spending $900 more a year on gas than four years ago. >> really adds up. there's a whole trickle down effect. >> the time now is 45 after the top of the hour and coming up, he is sitting behind bars
and fannie mae. a new report says that's what we need to help the economy bounce back. diane mass can heed doe has more. >> issuing a number of recommendations to changes of federal housing policies including the end to government backed lending as we know it. the report calls the housing america's future new direction for national policy aims to rebuild the private mortgage market and give home buyers and renters with a number of new policies and set of guidelines how to implement them. fannie mae and freddie mac replace them with a public garn tore which would guarantee mortgage payments without buying issue mortgage backed security. while it was necessary for the government to step in when the market collapsed five years ago the current role in housing is unsustainable at the moment. fanny, freddie report 90 percent of sij family mortgages and faa faces billions of dollars in losses. they also express the concern that credit worthy people are being denied housing due to overly strict underwriting standards. if they step back private lenders will step in. these recommendations are go on
believe in me. >> you can have college free. >> diane is director east bay college fund awarding its own scholarships and helps students. >> it's possible for many students to have their college education paid for. >> diane shows us some of the thousands of scholar shipz listed online. many are being awarded now. many will go unclaimed. >> thousands of, thousands of dollars left on the table because people do not apli. they didn't know bit. didn't spend 10 minutes to fill out forms. >> hundreds of companies and foundations offer grants, often for very specific types of students. >> someone who is child of someone involved in coal mining. there are farm workers children scholarships there are for people who went to prom in duct tape. >> sure enough there is a scholarship by the duct tape company. awarded to students who made a prom outfit out of duct tape z may have a few tour in design carlos aplig was work but reward will last a lifetime. >> don't ab frayed to put yourself out there. be like do you know what? yes. i want to do that, but i need help pe. have said yes. we'd love to help y
-convicts? is that even legal? diane macedo has the details. hi diane. >> hi, heather. the obama administration equal employment opportunity is threatening to sue businesses that won't hire convicts because it has an impact of niern hiring. criminal record exclusions have a different impact based on race and national origin. the commission's guidance on consideration of rays and conviction records says if a background check discloses a criminal defense they must do an vined you'llized assessment that proveings it has a business necessity not to hire that ex offender. if he doesn't do that they could be accused of race discrimination. the wall street journal reports they are demanding one client for those who lied about their record. businesses complying with state and local law that is ban ex-cons in certain fields can be targeted for lawsuits. if they hire the felon they could get sued by local government or outside party if a crime is committed but if they don't they could get sued by the ooc. studies found employers are much less likely to hire niernity applicants when background checks are banned
:50.   this is my friend diane. she's played by the rules her whole life. but then the rules flew right out the window. having just lost her husband, she stepped up and adopted her three grandkids, while working full time and caring for her brother, eddie, with cerebral palsy. i get the three children up. i walk andrew at eight i drop olivia off at eight thirty. spend a few minutes at emilio's school. i stop at the grocery store, and then i might do some laundry that has to be done. and then i have about five minutes. the baby sitter comes in and then i go to work. i'm not back home again until 11:30 at night. hard as she works, it's still a struggle to keep up with the bills and stay warm at night. when we asked the biggest oil companies to help families in need, only citgo, the people of venezuela, and president hugo chavez responded. thanks to them, citizens energy is able to deliver millions of gallons of fuel to families just like diane's. i'm joe kennedy. if you need help staying warm this winter, call me at 1-877-joe-4-oil. because no one should be left out in the cold! itit sparks a
're back after this. this is my friend diane. she's played by the rules her whole life. but then the rules flew right out the window. having just lost her husband, she stepped up and adopted her three grandkids, while working full time and caring for her brother, eddie, with cerebral palsy. i get the three children up. i walk andrew at eight i drop olivia off at eight thirty. spend a few minutes at emilio's school. i stop at the grocery store, and then i might do some laundry that has to be done. and then i have about five minutes. the baby sitter comes in and then i go to work. i'm not back home again until 11:30 at night. hard as she works, it's still a struggle to keep up with the bills and stay warm at night. when we asked the biggest oil companies to help families in need, only citgo, the people of venezuela, and president hugo chavez responded. thanks to them, citizens energy is able to deliver millions of gallons of fuel to families just like diane's. i'm joe kennedy. if you need help staying warm this winter, call me at 1-877-joe-4-oil. because no one should be left out in the cold
. >> tonight, there is evidence that america is waging a secret war in the middle east. i spoke with diane sawyer about that. martha raddatz is covering a secret war of sorts. >> it is the american secret war, and we will take you inside. she will show us what she found in the middle east today. >> switching gears a little bit, an experiment about what we are willing to pay for the food we really buy out there. >> if a restaurant owner said to you, paid what you feel you should pay for your restaurant meal, how much would you pay? more or less than they might charge? we have a hidden camera experiment that will show you exactly what would happen. i am so happy about you and peter. i am so excited. >> thank you very much. we are really excited and very happy. thank you very much. but it is a wonderful thing. >> have a wonderful evening and we will see you soon. >> so i take it you invited diane to the baby shower? >> they really taught me how to live without sleep, and that will be good when the new baby comes. >> more than 25,000 students and teachers around the world are taking place in a
, it's delicious." this is my friend diane. she's played by the rules her whole life. but then the rules flew right out the window. having just lost her husband, she stepped up and adopted her three grandkids, while working full time and caring for her brother, eddie, with cerebral palsy. i get the three children up. i walk andrew at eight i drop olivia off at eight thirty. spend a few minutes at emilio's school. i stop at the grocery store, and then i might do some laundry that has to be done. and then i have about five minutes. the baby sitter comes in and then i go to work. i'm not back home again until 11:30 at night. hard as she works, it's still a struggle to keep up with the bills and stay warm at night. when we asked the biggest oil companies to help families in need, only citgo, the people of venezuela, and president hugo chavez responded. thanks to them, citizens energy is able to deliver millions of gallons of fuel to families just like diane's. i'm joe kennedy. if you need help staying warm this winter, call me at 1-877-joe-4-oil. because no one should be
hopkins. >>> all right. still to come on eyewitness news saturday morning -- this is my friend diane. she's played by the rules her whole life. but then the rules flew right out the window. having just lost her husband she stepped up and adopted her three grandkids, while working full time and caring for her brother eddie, with cerebral palsy. i get the three children up. i walk andrew at eight i drop olivia off at eight thirty. spend a few minutes at emilio's school. i stop at the grocery store, and then i might do some laundry that has to be done. and then i have about five minutes. the baby sitter comes in and then i go to work. i'm not back home again until 11:30 at night. hard as she works, it's still a struggle to keep up with the bills and stay warm at night. when we asked the biggest oil companies to help families in need only citgo, the people of venezuela and president hugo chavez responded. thanks to them, citizens energy is able to deliver millions of gallons of fuel to families just like diane's. i'm joe kennedy. if you need help staying warm this winter call me at 1-877
friend diane. she's played by the rules her whole life. but then the rules flew right out the window. having just lost her husband, she stepped up and adopted her three grandkids, while working full time and caring for her brother, eddie, with cerebral palsy. i get the three children up. i walk andrew at eight i drop olivia off at eight thirty. spend a few minutes at emilio's school. i stop at the grocery store, and then i might do some laundry that has to be done. and then i have about five minutes. the baby sitter comes in and then i go to work. i'm not back home again until 11:30 at night. hard as she works, it's still a struggle to keep up with the bills and stay warm at night. when we asked the biggest oil companies to help families in need, only citgo, the people of venezuela, and president hugo chavez responded. thanks to them, citizens energy is able to deliver millions of gallons of fuel to families just like diane's. i'm joe kennedy. if you need help staying warm this winter, call me at 1-877-joe-4-oil. because no one should be left out in the cold! >>> welcome back. the ts
. is it still happening tonight? >> well, i've got to tell you, diane, it's almost a thing of the past. not entirely. for the most part, the republicans are sitting on their side, the democrats are staying on their side. but there are some notable exceptions that i'm noticing as i look down into the chamber. first of all, you see senators lindsey graham and john mccain. two of the biggest headaches for this president, especially going into the second term, but sitting between them tonight, you will see senator chuck schumer, the number three democrat in the house. he wants to craft an immigration compromise with republicans. they're his two closest allies on that. so, they will be down there together. and also, i see, out of camera view off to the side, we have, for the first time in american history, two african-american senators. both recently appointed to fill vacancies. tim scott of south carolina, senator will cowan of massachusetts. and they are democrat and republican and they are sitting together also on the side. but for the most part, they are back to their battle stations he
that was done in appropriations committee and diane is a senior -- when i say senior i mean high ranking. i was a senior too so i take it as a complement but that's where a lot of this work is done so without president barack obama and his commitment to build america we wouldn't have this success today and it's a global vision but it has an impact on everyone that comes to san francisco and especially those that live in san francisco and makes a great difference in the lives of our friends in chinatown and we celebrate their work too and thank you very much for this very important day. [applause] >> so please check that score for me again nancy. our next speaker was once our mayor -- will always be our mayor, one that has served so well in the senate and now while she has a higher calling she still finds time to remind me "make sure i pay attention to the streets of san francisco" but she has also been a great supporter of not only transportation, but this year she's also said we're going to make sure we protect the cleanest water system this country has, our hetch hetchy. please welcome
. senators diane feinstein delivered a feast to mark the baltimore victory over the 49ers. >> thank you for trusting ktvu channel 2 news. we'll see you the next time news breaks. our coverage continues with the 10:00 news. tmz is up next right here on tv 36. there is no mass-produced human. so we created the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs. each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort... individualized. at the ultimate sleep number event, queen mattresses start at just $599. and save 50% on our innovative limited edition bed.
aggressive about it. >> diane feinstein, following up on your point, says, look, we have such a process. i don't think you can calculate the hostility and the enmity that is generated by civilian deaths. >> drones _ the tragic nature of being a superpower. people are going to get drone s and come back at us. but it is still necessary that we do these things because what else are we going to do? >> we have a secret army and the cia is going off on its own. you wrote a book about this -- >> it makes me extremely anxious because the history of a covert action is that it often backfires. i hate to be fruity about this, but if you are a superpower and try to keep peace and the world, you are going to be reprehensible things and it is almost guaranteed to come back and bite you, but you still have to do it. >> i remember you predicted right after 9/11, get ready, we will do unpalatable things. >> of course, it just goes with the territory. >> there was this moment in the hearings that i thought was indicative which was actually about waterboarding and torture, in which brennan said he knew about
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